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  • Position : Deputy Head of the Representative Office of Rossotrudnichestvo - Russian House in Bishkek
  • Affiliation : Rossotrudnichestvo
  • Affiliation : Chairman, International Union of Veterans of Nuclear Energy and Industry
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Nuclear Non-Proliferation Culture: A New Resource for Russian Public Diplomacy

Viktor Murogov, Albert Zulkharneev

The year 2012 marks the ten-year anniversary of UN General Assembly resolution 57/60 and the UN Secretary General's report on disarmament and non-proliferation education. At the very beginning of the 21st century, it became clear that a new wave of interest in atomic energy, dubbed the "nuclear renaissance," is engulfing an ever greater number of states. Nuclear technologies and materials have not yet become an object of common everyday use, but access to them by new countries, companies and people is increasing. Accordingly, the risks are growing of their falling into "unclean hands." Throughout the world, people know that one cannot walk across the road on a red light, every person traveling in a motor vehicle must wear a seat belt, and on crowded public transport you need to watch your wallet. Society develops rules for behavior that are easy to understand and taught to us since early child hood, helpful in protecting life and making it more comfortable.

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Imprint:

International Affairs, vol. 58, no. 2 (2012), pp. 59 - 72

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