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  • Affiliation : Member, International Advisory Board, International Luxembourg Forum on Preventing Nuclear Catastroph
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Letter to editor

Tariq Rauf

The outcome of the 2015 Review Conference was not unexpected. It was clear since the 2014 NPT PrepCom that the Middle East and nuclear disarmament would be issues where the gaps were unbridgeable. Reasons for failure were plenty. Even if one accepts at face value the statements of the NAM and the Arab Group that they were prepared to accept the President’s draft final document, then it might have passed muster if the NWS too were prepared to be flexible — however, many in the Humanitarian Impact of Nuclear Weapons (HINW) group and in NAC were very unhappy with the forward-looking disarmament paragraphs. The draft document, if accepted, would have strengthened accountability on disarmament. It should be understood clearly that it is not possible to progress nuclear dismantlement and disarmament through the NPT process — unfortunate though that might be.

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Imprint:

Security Index (Global Edition), No. 1 (110), Volume 21, Summer 2015

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