Popular articles

The 2015 NPT Review Conference, which failed to approve a Final Document, has put into stark relief the key challenges facing the nuclear nonproliferation regime. These challenges fall under four main categories: ongoing difficulties with the implementation and universalization of the treaty, distur...

Evgeny Buzhinskiy, Chairman of the PIR Center’s Executive Board and former head of the International Treaty Directorate at the Russian Ministry of Defense, believes that the Warsaw NATO Summit has become an important landmark capturing a new military and political reality: Russia has become the main...

A Policy Memo

Executive Summary

Cybersecurity challenges have become one of the key concerns for the operators across all critical infrastructure (CI) sectors. Rapid progress in offensive cyber capabilities and upsurge of the number of CI cybersecurity incidents demand urgent reaction from operators...

All articles

Poll




 
Did you enjoy the article?
 

authors

  • Position : Special Advisor
  • Affiliation : PIR Center
complete list

Russia's Nuclear Quest Comes Full Circle. Lessons from Two Post-Soviet Decades

Vladimir Orlov

On December 25, 1991, Mikhail Gorbachev handed over his briefcase containing Russia's nuclear launch codes to Boris Yeltsin. Eighteen months after Russia declared its sovereignty from the Soviet Union and six months after his election as Russian president, Yeltsin received the keys to the contry's nuclear arsenal. Yet another agonizing six months would pass before Russia firmly established its status as the legal successor to the Soviet Union in matters of nuclear weapons. Over the next several years an awareness slowly developed about what kind of heritage Russia had acquired and how best to put that heritage to use.

Russia's Nuclear Quest Comes Full Circle. Lessons from Two Post-Soviet Decades (full text)


Imprint:

Russia in Global Affairs. Vol. 9, No. 4, October-December 2011

Comments

 
 
loading