Events

PIR Center Consultant Oleg Demidov speaks in a session of the 7th Russian Internet Governance Forum (RIGF-2016), Moscow

Experts

  • Affiliation : Head of Strategic Projects, Kaspersky Lab
  • Affiliation : Deputy Director at Radio Frequencies and Communication Networks Regulation Department of Ministry of Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation
  • Position : Consultant
  • Affiliation : PIR Center
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Security of EU Critical Infrastructure: Lessons for Russia

12.04.2016

MOSCOW, APRIL 13, 2016. PIR PRESS - “Current dynamics of threats and challenges to cybersecurity of critical infrastructure show that the EU does not have next 10 years for enhancing critical information infrastructures categorizations and specifying  general regulatory guidelines for protection of critical infrastructures (CI) from cyber threats. The process should be speeded up and effective transborder mechanism in the field of CI cybersecurity should be put in place immediately. This premise is relevant not only for EU, but for Russia as well, particularly since in Russia’s case within this complex process, there is no need to coordinate national approaches at the uppermost, supranational level of regulation.” — Oleg Demidov, PIR Center consultant.

On April 7, 2016, the 7th Russian Internet Governance Forum (RIGF 2016) was held in Moscow. The primary issue raised before the forum participants was the potential for a global consensus in the field of internet governance.  One of the panels was dedicated to the issue of making critical internet infrastructure more stable, which is an important aspect of global internet governance.

At the session “Para Bellum? Si vis pacem!” PIR Center consultant Oleg Demidov presented a report on the management of critical infrastructure within the European Union.  He noted that, over the past ten years, the EU has developed an extensive system of papers, covering European critical infrastructures, as well as the general critical information infrastructure. A wide variety of EU agencies participated in the formation of this body of documents, including the European Commission, the European Parliament, ENISA, and others.  At the same time, a common terminology and classification within the European Union has not yet been agreed upon. 

“Current dynamics of threats and challenges to cybersecurity of critical infrastructure show that the EU does not have next 10 years for enhancing critical information infrastructures categorizations and specifying  general regulatory guidelines for protection of critical infrastructures (CI) from cyber threats. The process should be speeded up and effective transborder mechanism in the field of CI cybersecurity should be put in place immediately. This premise is relevant not only for EU, but for Russia as well, particularly since in Russia’s case within this complex process, there is no need to coordinate national approaches at the uppermost, supranational level of regulation.” — concluded Oleg Demidov. 

Andrey Yarnykh, member of the PIR Center Advisory Board, Head of GR and strategic projects of the Kaspersky Lab, raised the topic of cyber weapons at the same session.  According to Yarnykh, in recent times, a fallacy has emerged that cyber weapons are more humane due to their high levels of technology and precision.  In reality, as Yarnykh pointed out, such weapons are capable of potentially enormous consequences, in that they are capable of “drawing all computer users into the battlefield,” and can be sold or exchanged anonymously.  According to Yarnykh, the development of such weapons will inevitably generate distrust between countries, though there is no way to 100% protect oneself from such a threat. 

Open Network Association expert Georgiy Gritsai, Director of MSK-IX Elena Voronina, and Internet Society Manager of European Regional Affairs Maarit Palovirta also took part in the panel.

More detailed information on the RIGF 2016 can be found on the forum website.

For any questions related to the PIR Center's program on “Global Internet Governance and International Information Security”, please contact PIR Center Projects Coordinator Alyona Makhukova at the address makhukova at pircenter.org.


 

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