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PIR Center Special Advisor Vladimir Orlov participated in sessions of the un Secretary General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters

21.09.2017

NEW YORK, SEPTEMBER 21, 2017. PIR PRESS. — “The impact of artificial intelligence on international security: both negative and beneficial; assessment of the cyberattack threats on nuclear and bio-facilities; and, finally, recommendations on the development of disarmament and nonproliferation education. These three topics were at the heart of the agenda of the 68th session of the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters in New York”, — Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, member of the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, Special Advisor to the PIR Center.

At the ongoing 72nd session of the UN General Assembly in New York, delegations have been presented with the report of the UN Secretary General on the work of his Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters in 2017. The report includes recommendations by the members of the Board. At the moment, the Board consists of representatives of the following fifteen countries: Australia, Chile, China, Croatia, France, Ghana, Jordan, Mongolia, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Russia, Spain, the United States, as well as the Director of the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Affairs (UNIDIR). For three years now, the Founder & Special Advisor to the PIR Center, the Head of the Center for Global Trends and International Organizations of the Diplomatic Academy of the Russian Foreign Ministry, Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, has been participating in the  work of the Board as a delegate of the Russian Federation.

The regular meeting of the sixty-eighth session of the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, at which the recommendations were developed, was held on 28-30 June 2017 in New York.

After summarizing the results of the last meeting, Vladimir Orlov noted: “The impact of artificial intelligence on international security: both negative and beneficial; assessment of the cyberattack threats on nuclear and bio-facilities; and, finally, recommendations on the development of disarmament and nonproliferation education. These three topics were at the heart of our agenda. In addition to our current agenda, the Board members discussed with the new High Representative for Disarmament Affairs Ms. Izumi Nakamitsu a whole range of urgent issues: Whose chemical weapons have been used in Syria and how to avoid politicization of this issue? What to do with the DPRK nuclear program? How to react on a new treaty banning nuclear weapons?”

Addressing the members of his Board in a letter, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres noted “I look forward to further discussions and final recommendations” on these issues “especially with regard to the fact that artificial intelligence technologies can prove to be a useful tool in achieving disarmament and non-proliferation goals and arms control”.

The Board, in its turn, determined specific aspects of the issue of artificial intelligence that should be considered in the course of its future work. Having identified the “human in the loop/on the loop” concepts as a crucial threshold issue for thinking about artificial intelligence, Board members expressed the strong conviction that machines should not be permitted to make decisions to target or kill humans. Regarding proposals that the United Nations should immediately adopt a “ban on offensive autonomous weapons beyond meaningful human control”, exactly how such a ban might be agreed internationally should be examined by the Board at its next meeting. The implications for both offensive and defensive systems need to be considered.

Additional specific issues that should be tackled by the Board include: intangible technology transfers and the lack of international regulatory standards or structures for dealing with them; and the possibility of export control regimes (3D printing is seen as having particular implications for weapons proliferation).

Two other issues the Board paid attention to this year, namely, the assessment of threat of cyberattacks on nuclear facilities and on bio-facilities and on the development of the disarmament and non-proliferation education, - will be covered by PIR PRESS in the following weeks.

 

PIR Center has an ongoing project on emerging technologies and security directed by Dr. Vadim Kozyulin. Recently, PIR PRESS published articles, reports and debates on AIBattle robots: accounted threats or unexpected?by Vadim Kozyulin, Albert Efimov, Tom Grant, Andrey Grebenshikov, Gilles Giacca, Xinping Song, and Mary Workhem;  and “New Bond - machine with license for murderby Vadim Kozyulin and Albert Efimov(in Russian language).

For questions regarding to the participation of Vladimir Orlov in the UN Secretary-General's Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, please contact us by phone +7 (495) 987 19 15 or e-mail orlov at pircenter.org.


 

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