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It has been 15 years since the United Nations conducted a study on disarmament and nonproliferation education, as well as provided 34 recommendations on how to move it far ahead. A lot has been done in this field over this period; however, yet unresolved issues and new challenges suggest that new eff...

Action 22: All states are encouraged to implement the recommendations contained in the report of the Secretary-General of the United Nations (A/57/124) regarding the United Nations study on disarmament and non-proliferation education, in order to advance the goals of the treaty in support of achievi...

PIR Center offers 10-year plan on improving disarmament and nonproliferation education

09.04.2018

 

MOSCOW, APRIL 9, 2018. PIR PRESS. – “The 17 ambassadors selected in 2019 for five years will pass the richness of experience as well as their own ideas to the new, young generation, not only symbolically, but in practice… Starting from 2025, it will be up to the young and bright students or former students to provide their vision on this matter and to take the lead in promoting disarmament and nonproliferation education in their respective regions, as well as globally,” – Dr. Vladimir Orlov, PIR Center’s Founder and Special Advisor, and Mr. Adlan Margoev, PIR Center’s “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director.

On the 15th anniversary of the landmark 2002 United Nations Study on Disarmament and Non-proliferation Education, the United Nations Office of Disarmament Affairs (UNODA) published a special edtion of its Occasional Papers devoted to disarmament and nonproliferation education.

The 2002 Study was elaborated by a cross-regional Group of Governmental Experts from ten Member States: Egypt, Hungary, India, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Poland, Senegal, and Sweden. 

PIR Center’s Founder and Special Advisor Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, who consulted the Group in 2002, as well as PIR Center’s Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation Program Director Adlan Margoev contributed to the new edition of UNODA Occasional Papers.

In Recommendations of the 2002 Study: Where we stand now and where we should go further, including ideas for the next 10 years, the experts analyze the current state of implementation of the 2002 Study and discuss the ways to promote and improve education in disarmament and non-proliferation based on the recent experience in this field. Dr. Orlov and Mr. Margoev affirm that the 2002 United Nations Study is still valid, as well as all its 34 recommendations. They also identify three major areas of challenges and opportunities associated with the Study: reporting, implementation, and international cooperation.

In terms of reporting, both experts consider unacceptable that only five Member States presented in 2016 a report to the UN General Assembly on the implementation of the biennial resolution 69/65. They think it is necessary to raise awareness on the importance of disarmament and non-proliferation education, as well as on the recommendations contained in the Study.

For improving the implementation of the 34 recommendations, they believe that allocation of human and financial resources for disarmament and nonproliferation education, and training should be re-energized and made specific. They recalled the important contribution that higher education institutions and think tanks could do to complement States Members’ efforts. In that regard, they highlighted the educate-the-educators program in nonproliferation studies, as well as the International School on Global Security, both established by PIR Center, as good practices of the aforementioned.

 

Dr. Orlov and Mr. Margoev affirm that “the objectives of contemporary disarmament and nonproliferation education and training remain the same as they were identified in the Study 15 years ago”. For this reason, in order to achieve them in today’s globalized and interconnected world, they provide “new and actionable ideas on how to take disarmament and nonproliferation education forward now and in the future”. Such ideas include putting more emphasis in using other languages other than English; providing specialized training to nuclear engineers, scientists, as well as policymakers from nuclear industry “newcomer” States; enhancing the knowledge of journalists and media representatives on disarmament and non-proliferation; as well as the creation of international M.A programs with the collaboration of two or more reputable universities. In that regard, the new Dual Degree Program in Nonproliferation Studies established in 2016 by the Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO University) and the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) is mentioned as a relevant example.

The authors of the article also suggest a plan of specific projects for the next decade whose aim is to promote disarmament and nonproliferation education in today’s globalized and interconnected world through advanced international cooperation. The plan envisions holding three worldwide competitions in 2019 among universities and individuals as educators, and individual journalists in the field of disarmament and nonproliferation to select for a 5-year period 17 peer ambassadors who work in all 6 official UN languages. In 2024, another 6 peer ambassadors will be selected among students as a result of 4-year online debates on disarmament and nonproliferation.

“With this, – concluded their article Dr. Orlov and Mr. Margoev, – the 17 ambassadors selected in 2019 for five years will pass the richness of experience as well as their own ideas to the new, young generation, not only symbolically, but in practice. The year 2024 will be a transition year for sharing such experience and for passing it from the most experienced to the young. Starting from 2025, it will be up to the young and bright students or former students to provide their vision on this matter and to take the lead in promoting disarmament and nonproliferation education in their respective regions, as well as globally.”

For questions related to PIR Center’s educational program, you can contact the Program Coordinator Yuliya Seslavinskaya by phone +7 (499) 940 09 83 or email seslavinskaya@pircenter.org

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