Chronology

The USSR commissions the first world commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) in the city of Obninsk (Kaluga Region).
27.06.1954
PIR PRESS LOGO

PIR PRESS NEWS

23.06.2022

On June 25, at 20:00 in Zvenigorod (Moscow region), as part of the Maslin Fest, the PIR Community is holding the First Charity Auction in support of the PIR Center Education & Training Program. Among the lots on display: unique materials from the 1990s, bibliographic and research rarities from our storerooms, books and magazines with autographs of the authors. To participate in the auction, it is enough to register for the Maslin Fest.

23.06.2022

On June 22, 2022, the XXI International School on Global Security for young professionals from Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) was visited by Sergei Ryabkov, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Russia. He noticed the fundamental theses of the Russian foreign policy doctrine and assessed the current situation of the Russian Federation on the world stage and prospects for the development of relations with partners.

21.06.2022

In an Vladimir Orlov's interview, director of PIR Center, with Jorge Ferrer, a journalist of the Spanish newspaper El Mundo, the issues of the risks of using nuclear weapons against the background of the Ukrainian conflict are touched upon. We also talked about how the Chekhov's gun differs from nuclear weapons, whether Russia will use tactical nuclear weapons in Ukraine, whether European children can sleep peacefully now, American or Russian nuclear weapons pose a great danger to global security, whether there is reason for optimism today and which race will replace the current unwise human race.

19.06.2022

On June 19, the official opening of the XXI International School on Global Security took place. The director of PIR Center Vladimir Orlov and the coordinator of Education & Training Program of the PIR Center Elena Karnaukhova addressed the students of the School with a welcoming speech. He stressed the importance of holding face-to-face scientific and educational events and suggested to forget about "zooms" for a while, and tune in to active, live communication. The participants of the School will have an exciting 9 days full of discussions on pressing issues of global security.

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia

“The fact that the Treaty on the Nuclear-Weapons-Free-Zone in Central Asia entered into force is a notable success for the international non-proliferation regime. It is especially important against the background of recent challenges and crises facing the regime in recent years, as well as in the absence of any other remarkable progress and breakthroughs. Surrounded by zones of nuclear instability from Middle East through Pakistan to East Asia, being a victim of nuclear tests, Central Asia deserves to have a nuclear weapons free zone on the land of its nations”.

President of PIR Center Vladimir Orlov

On March 21, 2009 the Treaty of the Nuclear-Weapons-Free-Zone in Central Asia signed by the Republic of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, the Republic of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Republic of Uzbekistan in Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan) on September 8, 2006, entered into force.

CANWFZ-1

Its member-states undertake to ban production, acquisition and deployment of nuclear weapons and its components or other nuclear explosive devices on their territories. At the same time, the Treaty allows using nuclear energy for peacful purposes.

A new zone in Central Asia has a number of unique features: it is the first weapons-free-zone in the Northern hemishere, in a region neighboring nuclear Russia and China. Also the Treaty has become the first multilateral security agreement which includes all five Central Asian countries.

The UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon noted that it would be the first NWFZ in a region where nuclear weapons previously existed. He also pointed out one more feature of the Treaty: it is the first one that would require its members to sign Additional Protocol with the IAEA and to follow obligations of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

 

Documents

Declaration on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World (12 October 2011, Astana, Kazakhstan)

Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (with Protocol and Rules of Procedure to Implement Article 10 of the Treaty) (8 September 2006, Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan)

Analysis

Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (Treaty of Semipalatinsk, CANWFZ Treaty) (in Russian) (a chapter from the project of the 3rd issue of the Textbook "Nuclear Non-Proliferation")

"Kazakhstan Regrets that NPT is Asymmetric and Not Efficient Enogh" (in Russian) (Security Index, No.1 (100), 2012. PP.37-46)

On Ways toward a World without Nuclear Weapons (in Russian) (Security Index, No.1 (88), 2009. PP.19-30)

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia: How to Get Support of the Nuclear Five? (in Russian) (Security Index, No.3 (86), 2008. PP.77-84)

Treaty of Semipalatinsk (in Russian) (an article from the brief encyclopedia "Nuclear Non-Proliferation")

Central Asia: S.O.S for Nuclear Zero (Security Index, No.3 (85), Volume 14, 2008. PP.123-129)

The Russian Position on the Creation of a Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone in Central Asia (Yaderny Control (Nuclear Control) Digest No.9. Winter 1998/1999. PP.15-24)

PIR PRESS

Treaty on the Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia entered into force (PIR-PRESS, 10 April 2009)

The unique feature of the draft Treaty establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia is its provision making compliance with the IAEA Additional Protocol legally binding for the states of the region (PIR-PRESS, 8 September 2006)

loading