Chronology

France conducts its last nuclear test.
27.01.1996
Nuclear Suppliers Group’s negotiators exchange letters approving the Guiding Principles for Nuclear Exports.
27.01.1976
The Treaty on Principles Governing the Activities of States in the Exploration and Use of Outer Space, including the Moon and Other Celestial Bodies (The Outer Space Treaty) is signed.
27.01.1967
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PIR PRESS NEWS

27.01.2021

This paper describes the current strategic and geopolitical environment and the main challenges it entails for the Russian-American strategic relations, including rapid technological revolution, the rise of nuclear multipolarity, and the complete lack of trust. The author believes that addressing the new threats that reject the 50-year-long era of arms control between Moscow and Washington requires achieving meaningful improvement in Russian-U.S. political relations to the level of serious dialogue on security issues between the two governments under the new conditions. Otherwise, deterrence will not only be the principal basis of strategic stability but its only remaining basis.

27.01.2021

Sergei Prikhodko, Security Index Editorial Board Member, has passed away at 64. 

22.01.2021

The Security Index Occasional Paper Series came out with the new report "Future of arms control: views from Russia" that consists of two articles: “U.S.-Russia arms control: where we are and where we are going” by Evgeny Buzhinskiy and “Broadening the scope of arms control: new strategic systems, “non strategic” arsenals, conventional long-range precision strike, hypersonic missiles, missile defense and space capabilities” by Dmitry Stefanovich.

International Security Index iSi

 This project is completed. Information is not being updated

THE DOW JONES OF INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

What is iSi? - The International Security Index (iSi) is a comprehensive index of the level of international security developed by the PIR Center through a project that has been ongoing for over a year. The project is currently undergoing an international assessment. The iSi index is meant to demonstrate the extent to which the international security situation differs from the “ideal”  (assumed as 4210 points according to our methodology) at each point in time. It also indicates how various specific military and nonmilitary factors are effecting international security.

How is iSi calculated? - The most important characteristics of iSi are its comprehensiveness, robustness, and clarity. A great number of the factors that directly effect international security are reflected in iSi in a concentrated form. They include: the threat of global nuclear war, the number and intensity of local conflicts, the type of political relations between various countries and international organizations, the intensity and scale of terrorist activity, the stability of the global economy, and the threat posed by man-made catastrophes and epidemics. The aim of iSi is to provide quantitative indicators that reflect the dynamics of trends in international security. The iSi index is meant to demonstrate the extent to which the international security situation differs from the “ideal” at each point in time. It also indicates how various specific military and nonmilitary factors are affecting international security.  More details on iSi methodology is availabla here.

What is International expert group (INTEG) for? - The PIR Center's monthly calculation of iSi is accompanied by interviews with our International Expert Group, which includes representatives from Russia, Argentina, Brazil, China, France, Hungary, India, Saudi Arabia, Sweden the United States and Uzbekistan. The evaluations of these experts in no way influence the calculation of the Index. Nevertheless, they make it possible for us to see how our calculations are viewed in a given month and, in particular, the dynamics of iSi over the course of several months at a time, in various regions of the world.

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