Chronology

Russia President Vladimir Putin and U.S. president George W. Bush sign in Moscow the treaty between the Russian Federation and the United States of America on "Reduction of Strategic Offensive Potentials" (SOP Treaty).
24.05.2002
All nuclear weapons are withdrawn from Kazakhstan to Russia.
24.05.1995
The Protocol to the ABM Treaty permitting each side to have only one ABM deployment area comes into force.
24.05.1976
The Presidium of the CC CPSU decides to deploy medium-range missiles on Cuba (to protect Cuba from the U.S. invasion and to balance with the American Tor and Jupiter missiles deployed in the UK, Italy and Turkey).
24.05.1962

International Security Index iSi

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PIR PRESS NEWS

22.05.2018

“What is the Gross National Happiness? What is the correlation between population’s happiness and society’s development? What are the reasons for the deepening global inequality? How to find a balance between material and spiritual values for a beneficial development of society? These issues have been at the core of my conversation with the leadership of the Gross National Happiness Centre Bhutan,” – Dr. Vladimir Orlov, Head of the Center for Global Trends and International Organizations of the Diplomatic Academy of the Russian Foreign Ministry, professor at MGIMO, PIR Center Founder & Special Advisor


16.05.2018

“Although there is a number of efforts to bridge Russia and the United States as key players in the NPT review process, unfortunately, today we are witnessing the opposite situation when the dialogue is falling apart. Even at this PrepCom we could witness both the dialogue and the traditionally established rules of behavior falling apart, which is very dangerous. We decided that we needed a special meeting involving next generation of nuclear nonproliferation specialists from both countries, which we called a Track 2.5 meeting. I am particularly grateful to the Gorchakov Fund for its support in bringing three young Russian specialists to the PrepCom and the seminar. The fact that the Russian official fund is interested in this channel of public diplomacy is notable,” – Dr. Vladimir Orlov, PIR Center Founder & Special Advisor.


10.05.2018

“It is necessary to maintain cooperation with Iran and send a clear signal to Russian partners abroad that Russia will support legitimate nuclear activities in Iran which correspond with the norms of international law. It is important to maintain such dialogue, as well as provide maximum support to Iran in the international arena and continue bilateral cooperation in the nuclear sphere,” - PIR Center’s “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director Adlan Margoev.

About the Program

Our Aim

The program prepares students for professional careers in the nonproliferation field in national governments, international organizations, academia, think tanks, and the private sector. The interdisciplinary curriculum focuses on global security, history, science and technology, area studies, public policy, and research methods—with a particular emphasis on practical skills.

 

Intended Outcomes

The program will provide students with essential competencies:

● advanced knowledge of WMD nonproliferation regimes, both global and regional

● knowledge about peaceful uses of nuclear energy and how to minimize potential proliferation risks

● familiarity with best practices in nuclear and WMD security

● knowledge of arms control and disarmament

● knowledge of terrorism and tools for countering it

● quantitative analysis skills

● foreign language skills

● strong practical skills from internship opportunities in Moscow, Monterey, Washington, D.C., Geneva, and Vienna

 

Unique Courses and Program Structure

Students will take classes at MGIMO in Moscow in the fall semester of the first year. They will take classes at MIIS in Monterey in the second and third semesters (spring of the first year and fall of the second year). The fourth and final semester will be devoted to an internship and thesis preparation, with the student’s location determined on a case-by-case basis. The total workload of the program is 120 ECTS credits (60 U.S. credits), including classes and internships, as well as preparation and defense of a master’s thesis. All courses are delivered in English. However, native English speakers will also study Russian or another language.

 

Dual Degree

The graduates are awarded two master’s degrees: one from the Middlebury Institute with a degree in nonproliferation and terrorism studies (MANPTS) and the other from MGIMO University with a degree in international affairs.

 

Semesters One and Four at MGIMO

International Affairs (60 ECTS)

 

First Year, Fall

September–December

(30 ECTS)

January

● Core Courses

● Elective Courses

● Research Work

Exams

    

Second Year, Spring

February–May (30 ECTS)

June

Internship

● Thesis Research Work

● Final Exam

● Thesis Defense


Core Courses

● International Security and Global Issues

● Modern Strategy of the Russian Foreign Policy

● Methodology of Research and International Analysis

● International Organizations and Multilateral Regulation of WMD Nonproliferation

● History of Nuclear Programs and WMD Nonproliferation Regimes

● Great Powers and Regional Subsystems in World Politics

● Introduction to Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime and Current Global Developments

● Theory and Practice of Negotiations in the Sphere of WMD Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

● Regional Challenges to WMD Nonproliferation (Middle East, South and East Asia, Pacific)

Foreign Language


Elective Courses

● Russian Foreign and Security Policy on WMD Nonproliferation

● Modern International Conflicts and Peacekeeping—post-Soviet Space and Asia Pacific Region

● New Challenges to Nonproliferation Regimes

● Missile and Missile Technologies Proliferation

● International Cooperation in Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Nonproliferation

● Militarization of New Spaces

● Modern Arms Control Issues

● Nuclear Weapon-Free Zones


Semesters Two and Three at MIIS:

Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies (60 ECTS)


First Year, Spring

Second Year, Fall

Late January–May (30 ECTS)

Late August–December (30 ECTS)

● Core Courses

● Elective Courses

● Research Work

● Core Courses

● Elective Courses

● Research Work

 

Core Courses

Foreign Language

● Introduction to WMD Nonproliferation

● Introduction to Terrorism Studies

● Science and Technology for NPTS


Elective Courses

U.S. National Security Policy Making

● NPT Simulation

● Open Source Tools for NP Analysis

● Evolution of Chinese Nuclear Policy

● Seminar: Counterterrorism

● Seminar: Nuclear Forensics

● Seminar: CBRN Terrorism

● Security and Arms Control in Northeast Asia

● Quantitative Data Analysis

● The Nuclear Age: An Historical Introduction

● Cybersecurity Aspects of Nuclear Security

● Israel and the Bomb

● Seminar: Deterring and Influencing Terrorism and WMD

● Seminar: Strategic Trade Controls and Nonproliferation

● Seminar: WMD Proliferation in the Middle East

● Seminar: Biological and Chemical Weapons and Arms Control

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