Chronology

The U.S. and DPRK sign the Agreed Framework.
21.10.1994
Protocols 2 and 3 to the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty (the Treaty of Rarotonga) come into force for China.
21.10.1988

International Security Index iSi

PIR PRESS LOGO

PIR PRESS NEWS

20.10.2017

"All I have to say to Trump, abandon this reckless game before it’s too late! You are deluding yourself if you think you’ve been dealt all the trump cards. Your imaginary perfect is the enemy of the good. The JCPoA is a good deal. Signed not only by the United States, but also by six other countries (including Russia), it is working well. All the parties are abiding by their commitments. There can be no deal with Iran without Iran itself. Your imaginary grand bargain is a folly; it has no basis in reality." — Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Member of the UN Secretary-General’s Advisory Board on Disarmament Matters, PIR Center founder.

19.10.2017

“I am pleased to welcome Adlan Margoev and Yuliya Tseshkovskaya joining our team. At the PIR Center, we have invariably staked on young, bright and creative colleagues”. — Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Founder of the PIR Center. 

18.10.2017

“In the Universe there is a certain order of its existence, we are part of the universe, and we swung to an atom and decided to create a weapon, that could be a way of destroying the present mankind. I do not know if I understood this in 1995, but now and for a long time I am convinced that this is one of the ways of the extinction of mankind, and it can happen. Every day, it is necessary to think about how to avoid the annihilation of mankind” - Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador Roland Timberbaev, member of the PIR Center Advisory Board.

About the Program

Our Aim

The program prepares students for professional careers in the nonproliferation field in national governments, international organizations, academia, think tanks, and the private sector. The interdisciplinary curriculum focuses on global security, history, science and technology, area studies, public policy, and research methods—with a particular emphasis on practical skills.

 

Intended Outcomes

The program will provide students with essential competencies:

● advanced knowledge of WMD nonproliferation regimes, both global and regional

● knowledge about peaceful uses of nuclear energy and how to minimize potential proliferation risks

● familiarity with best practices in nuclear and WMD security

● knowledge of arms control and disarmament

● knowledge of terrorism and tools for countering it

● quantitative analysis skills

● foreign language skills

● strong practical skills from internship opportunities in Moscow, Monterey, Washington, D.C., Geneva, and Vienna

 

Unique Courses and Program Structure

Students will take classes at MGIMO in Moscow in the fall semester of the first year. They will take classes at MIIS in Monterey in the second and third semesters (spring of the first year and fall of the second year). The fourth and final semester will be devoted to an internship and thesis preparation, with the student’s location determined on a case-by-case basis. The total workload of the program is 120 ECTS credits (60 U.S. credits), including classes and internships, as well as preparation and defense of a master’s thesis. All courses are delivered in English. However, native English speakers will also study Russian or another language.

 

Dual Degree

The graduates are awarded two master’s degrees: one from the Middlebury Institute with a degree in nonproliferation and terrorism studies (MANPTS) and the other from MGIMO University with a degree in international affairs.

 

Semesters One and Four at MGIMO

International Affairs (60 ECTS)

 

First Year, Fall

September–December

(30 ECTS)

January

● Core Courses

● Elective Courses

● Research Work

Exams

    

Second Year, Spring

February–May (30 ECTS)

June

Internship

● Thesis Research Work

● Final Exam

● Thesis Defense


Core Courses

● International Security and Global Issues

● Modern Strategy of the Russian Foreign Policy

● Methodology of Research and International Analysis

● International Organizations and Multilateral Regulation of WMD Nonproliferation

● History of Nuclear Programs and WMD Nonproliferation Regimes

● Great Powers and Regional Subsystems in World Politics

● Introduction to Nuclear Nonproliferation Regime and Current Global Developments

● Theory and Practice of Negotiations in the Sphere of WMD Nonproliferation, Arms Control, and Disarmament

● Regional Challenges to WMD Nonproliferation (Middle East, South and East Asia, Pacific)

Foreign Language


Elective Courses

● Russian Foreign and Security Policy on WMD Nonproliferation

● Modern International Conflicts and Peacekeeping—post-Soviet Space and Asia Pacific Region

● New Challenges to Nonproliferation Regimes

● Missile and Missile Technologies Proliferation

● International Cooperation in Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Nonproliferation

● Militarization of New Spaces

● Modern Arms Control Issues

● Nuclear Weapon-Free Zones


Semesters Two and Three at MIIS:

Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies (60 ECTS)


First Year, Spring

Second Year, Fall

Late January–May (30 ECTS)

Late August–December (30 ECTS)

● Core Courses

● Elective Courses

● Research Work

● Core Courses

● Elective Courses

● Research Work

 

Core Courses

Foreign Language

● Introduction to WMD Nonproliferation

● Introduction to Terrorism Studies

● Science and Technology for NPTS


Elective Courses

U.S. National Security Policy Making

● NPT Simulation

● Open Source Tools for NP Analysis

● Evolution of Chinese Nuclear Policy

● Seminar: Counterterrorism

● Seminar: Nuclear Forensics

● Seminar: CBRN Terrorism

● Security and Arms Control in Northeast Asia

● Quantitative Data Analysis

● The Nuclear Age: An Historical Introduction

● Cybersecurity Aspects of Nuclear Security

● Israel and the Bomb

● Seminar: Deterring and Influencing Terrorism and WMD

● Seminar: Strategic Trade Controls and Nonproliferation

● Seminar: WMD Proliferation in the Middle East

● Seminar: Biological and Chemical Weapons and Arms Control

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