Chronology

The Treaty between the U.S. and the USSR on the Limitation of Underground Nuclear Weapon Tests and the Treaty between the USSR and the U.S. on Underground Nuclear Explosions for Peaceful Purposes come into force.
11.12.1990
The South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty (the Treaty of Rarotonga) enters into force.
11.12.1986
Additional Protocols I and II to the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America (Tlatelolco Treaty) come into force for Great Britain.
11.12.1969

International Security Index iSi

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PIR PRESS NEWS

08.12.2017

“Internship at the PIR Center was very beneficial in many ways. On professional level, I was challenged every day and learned much about Russian policies, interests and perspectives on various security questions. This opportunity gave me a real taste of what working in an efficient think tank is. On a personal level, working for the PIR has pushed me outside my comfort zone into a completely unknown environment. But despite my limited skills in Russian, I had the feeling of being completely accepted and integrated in the team. All in all, my only regret will be the short term of my internship!”

08.12.2017

“In the current highly politicized climate, the initiative for the International Convention on the Suppression of Acts of Chemical and Biological Terrorism may have a higher chance of succeeding if it transitions away from the usage of terrorist for non-state actor. Not only will it streamline the international legal framework by limiting the terminology to state and non-state actor, it will circumvent the necessity to provide a definition for terrorism”, –  Alicia Rorabaugh, PIR Center’s intern and student of the Dual Degree Master Program in Nonproliferation Studies

02.12.2017

“There is a proposal to start research and development [on a missile prohibited under the INF Treaty]. It is not prohibited according to the Treaty, but it seems to be the first step of violation of the soul of the Treaty. […] For us, this is an indication that activities to create a new missile violating the Treaty are going on. The United States is engaged in preparatory work to withdraw from the Treaty. We consider this to be a mistake. We have offered the United States to sit together and discuss all issues of mutual concern, find solutions to these issues, and avoid making efforts provoking the other side to give an adequate answer,” — Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the Russian Federation to the United States of America.

Careers and Internship Opportunities

Internship Opportunities

Students may spend their fourth semester in the United States, Russia, or another location. They are expected to do an internship of at least 12-weeks duration. MGIMO, MIIS, and PIR Center will assist with internship placement, including the possibility of intern positions in government agencies, international organizations, and think tanks. Possible international organizations for internship placement include the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs (UNODA), the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

 

Careers in Nonproliferation, Nuclear Energy, and Security

Students will gain skills they can apply immediately, while they are still in school. When students graduate they will become part of the worldwide networks of MIIS and MGIMO alumni. These networks will open doors wherever they go.

They pursue careers in governments, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), international organizations, and the private sector. Others who have an interest in an academic career go on to obtain doctorates at major research universities.

 

Nikita Perfilyev

Intern and research fellow in PIR Center (2006–2010), PhD student in MGIMO (2007), and graduate of the MA in Nonproliferation and Terrorism Studies program at MIIS (2008–2011). Currently officer in the capacity building and training section at the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). 

“If PIR Center’s Nonproliferation Summer School gave me a taste of the subject then a master’s degree from the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS) was a gateway to the world of multilateral diplomacy and international organizations working in the field of nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation. In Monterey I received world-class training in nuclear policy issues, which allowed me to join the CTBTO at the professional level with minimal adjustment time. The practical focus of curricula at MIIS enabled me to contribute to solving challenges facing the CTBTO from day one of my work. Although I had to choose between continuing my studies at MGIMO and going to Monterey, with the new PIR Center-MGIMO-Monterey dual degree program there is no need to compromise anymore. The joint degree will provide an opportunity for students studying in Russia to benefit from experience of all three partners”
 

Sarah Bidgood

MANPTS ’16, graduate of the PIR Center School on Global Security 

Participating in the PIR Center’s Security School was a truly unique opportunity. Not only was it a chance for me to learn about the Russian perspective on issues critical to global security, but it allowed me to interact on a personal level with Russian and Russian-speaking peers. My fellow participants could not have been more welcoming or more interested in my opinion on the current state of affairs. The lasting friendships I cultivated on the trip give me hope that my generation will be able to overcome diplomatic tensions and work cooperatively together in our future careers. I am incredibly grateful for this opportunity.
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