Chronology

US President Barack Obama announced revision plans to build a missile defense system in Eastern Europe
17.09.2009
Five new countries - Bahrain, Burundi, Congo, Nepal and Cape Verde - joined the IAEA
17.09.2007
Iran has confirmed shipment of the first batch of the Russian nuclear fuel for Busher NPP
17.09.2007

International Security Index iSi

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PIR PRESS NEWS

21.08.2019

Amb. Roland Timerbaev – a luminary in the field of nonproliferation, an undisputed authority, a great teacher and mentor – has passed away.


27.06.2019

“Autonomous systems are gradually displacing humans from the battlefield, and in many aspects, this can be a boon to the military, who are exposed to less risk. However, at the same time, humans transfer to artificial intelligence (AI) a part of their powers, and consequently a part of their responsibility. According to experts, neural networks will probably never learn to explain their decisions to humans. This can become a serious problem once AI is involved in such areas as intelligence, data analysis, communications and control, scenario development, and in the long run decision making.” – Director of PIR Center’s Emerging Technologies and Global Security Project Vadim Kozyulin.

12.05.2019

“The latest prepcom has two main opposite results: in two weeks it was not possible to reach consensus among the NPT members and agree on the text of recommendations for the 2020 Review Conference, but it was decided to appoint Argentinean diplomat Rafael Mariano Grossi as the Chair of the Review Conference – his formal appointment will take place at the end of 2019," Adlan Margoev, PIR Center “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director. 

Peaceful nuclear energy and international mechanisms of nonproliferation and nuclear security

(4 credits)

The course program developed by Dr. Alexey Ubeev, Member of the PIR Center’s Advisory Board

The course instructors: Dr. Alexey Ubeev, Dr. Mikhail Lysenko, Mr. Alexander Pavlov, Mr. Gleb Efremov

 

1.1    The place and role of the course in the program of study:

The course “Peaceful nuclear energy and international mechanisms of nonproliferation and nuclear security “  aims at providing knowledge on peaceful use of nuclear energy in the context of nonproliferation as well as to the key challenges to the nonproliferation regime – nuclear and radiological terrorism and other possible malicious acts involving nuclear material and facilities.

In accordance with Article IV of the Non-proliferation Treaty all the Parties to the Treaty have inalienable right to develop research, production and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. All the parties of the Treaty also have the right to participate in, the fullest possible exchange and transfer of equipment, materials and scientific and technological information for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy.

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, a new wave of interest in nuclear energy covers a growing number of states. Nuclear technology and materials have not yet become a subject of common everyday use, but access to them from the new countries, companies, and people significantly increased even after Fukushima accident. Thousands of specialists are receiving training in nuclear disciplines. All of them will have sensitive knowledge on nuclear technologies. All of them represent different countries and regions. The risks of nuclear proliferation increases. One of the key tasks to nuclear energy and nonproliferation experts, authorities and international organizations is to find ways for proliferation-resistant development of peaceful use of nuclear energy. . New nuclear programs are developed by countries situated in rather unstable regions. Access to fissile materials has significantly increased. The risk of nuclear and radiological terrorism can neither be ignored nor postponed.

 

The course makes introduction to key aspects of peaceful uses of nuclear energy and nonproliferation, including fundamentals and history, opportunities and risks of nuclear technologies use and international mechanisms in development of nuclear energy programs. The course also makes overview on key aspects of the complex issue of nuclear security, including key definitions and concepts, fundamentals and developments in nuclear security and international efforts on strengthening nuclear security worldwide.

The course goals and objectives:

The main goals of the course are:

- to provide students with basic knowledge on peaceful use of nuclear energy and international mechanisms and institutions in nuclear sphere in the context of nonproliferation regime;

- to introduce risks and threats to nuclear and radioactive materials and facilities, national efforts and international cooperation in nuclear security and nonproliferation.  

Course objectives:

  1. To introduce basic definitions, concepts, history current state and institutional structure of peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear security and international cooperation in these spheres.
  2. To orient students to understand the relationship between peaceful use of nuclear energy, nuclear nonproliferation and security and existing international mechanisms.
  3. To provide students with methodology of analysis of the proliferation risks, arising from peaceful use of nuclear technologies and international cooperation in the area of nuclear energy, safety and security.

1.2    Learning outcomes:

Classes are generally held to provide knowledge and methodology for further analysis and discussion on the matter of the course.

Teaching methods used include lectures with video, round-table discussions, case study, colloquiums, seminars, testing and students’ presentations.

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Understand interrelations between development of nuclear technologies, risks to nuclear nonproliferation and international cooperation in nuclear energy and nonproliferation.
  2. Analyze keys vulnerabilities and risks of nuclear fuel cycle and growing access to nuclear technologies.
  3. Correlate advantages and risks of peaceful use of nuclear energy and international cooperation in this sphere.  
  4. Analyze and compare national, international bilateral and multilateral initiatives and programs in nuclear security.  
  5. Assess the efficiencies and deficiencies of the existing political and legal frameworks of international cooperation in nuclear security and nonproliferation.
  6. Search information literature on nuclear nonproliferation and nuclear security issues; distinguish between authoritative and unreliable sources on these issues.

Course requirements:

Students will be required to attend not less than 90% of classes and to be prepared for class discussions. Conscientious reading of the assigned materials is compulsory. Students will also be required to participate in seminar and round-table discussions and to present written test.

Presentations (requirements):

1.3    Grading plan:

  •  Class participation – 10 %.
  •  Seminar presentation and activity – 30 %.
  •  Test results – 60 %.

Two seminars, two round-table discussions, two colloquiums, one business-case discussion and three “checking points’ during the semester – written tests.

 

Course Outline & Literature (available in pdf

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