Chronology

The Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America (Tlatelolco Treaty) comes into force for Cuba.
23.10.2002
The RF Government approves the "Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Material Management Disposal" program.
23.10.1995
The IAEA Statute is adopted.
23.10.1956

International Security Index iSi

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PIR PRESS NEWS

23.09.2019

Students of the fourth cohort of the dual degree master program WMD Nonproliferation, Nuclear Policy and Global Security, which is run jointly by The Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey (MIIS), Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO), and PIR Center, started their studies at MGIMO University in September.

21.08.2019

Amb. Roland Timerbaev – a luminary in the field of nonproliferation, an undisputed authority, a great teacher and mentor – has passed away.


27.06.2019

“Autonomous systems are gradually displacing humans from the battlefield, and in many aspects, this can be a boon to the military, who are exposed to less risk. However, at the same time, humans transfer to artificial intelligence (AI) a part of their powers, and consequently a part of their responsibility. According to experts, neural networks will probably never learn to explain their decisions to humans. This can become a serious problem once AI is involved in such areas as intelligence, data analysis, communications and control, scenario development, and in the long run decision making.” – Director of PIR Center’s Emerging Technologies and Global Security Project Vadim Kozyulin.

Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy of the Russian Federation

“Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy of the Russian Federation”

 

(2 credits)

© The course program developed by Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, MGIMO University Professor, 2019.

Course instructors: Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Dr. Ildar Akhtamzyan.

 

1.1     The place and role of the course in the program of study

The course “Foreign & Security Policy on Nuclear Nonproliferation of the Russian Federation” aims at providing knowledge on the role that nuclear nonproliferation and arms control has been playing in the foreign policy of the Soviet Union and, later on, of the Russian Federation starting from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) was signed in 1968 and until the current period. The course also covers a broader dimension of the nuclear-related policy of the Russian Federation as it is not limited to foreign policy but also addresses defense and security policy. The course puts Russian nonproliferation policy in a broader context of contemporary foreign and security policy.

The course, therefore, has two dimensions.

The first one, historic, addresses the issues in their chronological development and in four phases: 1) Soviet period 1968-1991; 2) Disintegration of the Soviet Union and transitional period 1991 – 1992; 3) The initial period of the foreign policy of the Russian Federation on nuclear nonproliferation 1992 – 1999; 4) The current period of the foreign policy of the Russian Federation on nuclear nonproliferation 2000 – to date.

The second dimension addresses the main areas of the Russian nonproliferation policy, including major problems and challenges as well as priority geographical areas relevant to the course.

1.2. The course goals and objectives:

The main goal of the course is to provide students with basic knowledge of the nuclear nonproliferation policy of the Russian Federation as a nuclear-weapon state reflecting its development and continuity as well as challenges it faces in the global security context.

Course objectives are as follows:

  1. To introduce Russian nuclear nonproliferation policy, in a broader context of Russian foreign and security policy.
  2. To orient students to understand the role of nuclear weapons in Russia’s doctrinal documents (military doctrine, national security strategy, and foreign policy concept) and in defense policy planning.
  3. To provide students with case studies of Russian nonproliferation policy vis-à-vis various regions of the world.

1.3.  Learning outcomes:

Classes are generally held to promote discussion on issues concerned.

Teaching methods used include lectures, seminars discussions, students’ seminar presentations, essay writing, and roundtables (interactive discussions) with Russian senior diplomats and legislators dealing with nuclear nonproliferation and security policy.

By the end of this course students should be able to:

  1.  Apply basic theoretical concepts of nuclear nonproliferation and role of nuclear weapons to Russian nonproliferation policy.
  2.  Provide comparative analysis of the phases of the Soviet/Russian nuclear nonproliferation policy.
  3.  Assess the efficiencies and deficiencies of the existing frameworks of Russian foreign policy in the context of nuclear nonproliferation.
  4.  Give reasons to the prospects of arжms control.
  5.  Search literature on Russian nonproliferation policy, distinguish between reliable and non-reliable internet resources on the issue.

1.4.  Course requirements:

Students will be required to attend not less than 90% of classes and to be prepared for class discussions. Conscientious reading of the assigned materials is compulsory. Final assessment will consist of three parts and be a grade point average after tree provisional tests: students’ active participation in seminar discussions, preparation of essay and its presentation by students.  If the student receives ≥ 70 average points, he/she passes the final test automatically. If the average points are < 70, the student passes the final test orally. In that case final assessment is < 70 points.

1.5.  Grading plan:

To get «А» (“excellent”) student should get 90-100 points

 

Max

Seminar

100

Essay 

100

Presentation

100

Average:

100

 

Course outline & Literature (available in pdf)

Lecture 1 Foreign and security policy of the Russian Federation

Lecture 1.2 Foreign and security policy of the Russian Federation

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