Chronology

South African President F. De Klerk ends development of nuclear weapons and eliminates available nuclear devices.
26.02.1990
The Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency enters into force.
26.02.1987
The USSR resumes nuclear tests, citing a lack of action on its initiatives by other nuclear weapons states, primarily the U.S.
26.02.1987
The USSR decides to create thermonuclear weapons.
26.02.1951

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PIR PRESS NEWS

20.02.2020

“As a journalist I know well how much more open and straight forward officials are when in an off the record modus. The upcoming discussions within the Trialogue Club International format in 2020 will give us all – so I hope – the possibility to better and deeper understand Russia’s foreign and security policy, to ask frank questions and get sincere answers”, - Dr. Elena V. Chernenko, Co-Chair, Trialogue Club International, PIR Center Executive Board member, Deputy Foreign Editor, Kommersant Daily.

 

 

17.02.2020

“The program is tailored to people with a very specific interest in nuclear issues. Getting to work with people who had been very active in the field of nonproliferation, both on the Russian and American side, is an opportunity few students get”, Dual Degree Master`s Program student Collin MacDowell.

10.02.2020

"Strategic stability in its classical sense – understood as a state of US- Russian relations under which neither side has incentives to launch a first nuclear strike – was developed during the Cold War", - a consultant at PIR Center Andrey Baklitskiy

This paper has been produced for the joint PIR Center – CSIS project “Reducing nuclear risks during Great Powers Competition”. We thank our partners in CSIS for their cooperation and support for this publication

Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy of the Russian Federation

“Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy of the Russian Federation”

 

(2 credits)

© The course program developed by Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, MGIMO University Professor, 2019.

Course instructors: Dr. Vladimir A. Orlov, Dr. Ildar Akhtamzyan.

 

1.1     The place and role of the course in the program of study

The course “Foreign & Security Policy on Nuclear Nonproliferation of the Russian Federation” aims at providing knowledge on the role that nuclear nonproliferation and arms control has been playing in the foreign policy of the Soviet Union and, later on, of the Russian Federation starting from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) was signed in 1968 and until the current period. The course also covers a broader dimension of the nuclear-related policy of the Russian Federation as it is not limited to foreign policy but also addresses defense and security policy. The course puts Russian nonproliferation policy in a broader context of contemporary foreign and security policy.

The course, therefore, has two dimensions.

The first one, historic, addresses the issues in their chronological development and in four phases: 1) Soviet period 1968-1991; 2) Disintegration of the Soviet Union and transitional period 1991 – 1992; 3) The initial period of the foreign policy of the Russian Federation on nuclear nonproliferation 1992 – 1999; 4) The current period of the foreign policy of the Russian Federation on nuclear nonproliferation 2000 – to date.

The second dimension addresses the main areas of the Russian nonproliferation policy, including major problems and challenges as well as priority geographical areas relevant to the course.

1.2. The course goals and objectives:

The main goal of the course is to provide students with basic knowledge of the nuclear nonproliferation policy of the Russian Federation as a nuclear-weapon state reflecting its development and continuity as well as challenges it faces in the global security context.

Course objectives are as follows:

  1. To introduce Russian nuclear nonproliferation policy, in a broader context of Russian foreign and security policy.
  2. To orient students to understand the role of nuclear weapons in Russia’s doctrinal documents (military doctrine, national security strategy, and foreign policy concept) and in defense policy planning.
  3. To provide students with case studies of Russian nonproliferation policy vis-à-vis various regions of the world.

1.3.  Learning outcomes:

Classes are generally held to promote discussion on issues concerned.

Teaching methods used include lectures, seminars discussions, students’ seminar presentations, essay writing, and roundtables (interactive discussions) with Russian senior diplomats and legislators dealing with nuclear nonproliferation and security policy.

By the end of this course students should be able to:

  1.  Apply basic theoretical concepts of nuclear nonproliferation and role of nuclear weapons to Russian nonproliferation policy.
  2.  Provide comparative analysis of the phases of the Soviet/Russian nuclear nonproliferation policy.
  3.  Assess the efficiencies and deficiencies of the existing frameworks of Russian foreign policy in the context of nuclear nonproliferation.
  4.  Give reasons to the prospects of arжms control.
  5.  Search literature on Russian nonproliferation policy, distinguish between reliable and non-reliable internet resources on the issue.

1.4.  Course requirements:

Students will be required to attend not less than 90% of classes and to be prepared for class discussions. Conscientious reading of the assigned materials is compulsory. Final assessment will consist of three parts and be a grade point average after tree provisional tests: students’ active participation in seminar discussions, preparation of essay and its presentation by students.  If the student receives ≥ 70 average points, he/she passes the final test automatically. If the average points are < 70, the student passes the final test orally. In that case final assessment is < 70 points.

1.5.  Grading plan:

To get «А» (“excellent”) student should get 90-100 points

 

Max

Seminar

100

Essay 

100

Presentation

100

Average:

100

 

Course outline & Literature (available in pdf)

Lecture 1 Foreign and security policy of the Russian Federation

Lecture 1.2 Foreign and security policy of the Russian Federation

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