Chronology

Head of the Soviet delegation in the UN Atomic Energy Commission A.A. Gromyko introduces a draft convention on the prohibition and elimination of atomic weapons within three months.
19.06.1946

International Security Index iSi

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PIR PRESS NEWS

12.05.2019

“The latest prepcom has two main opposite results: in two weeks it was not possible to reach consensus among the NPT members and agree on the text of recommendations for the 2020 Review Conference, but it was decided to appoint Argentinean diplomat Rafael Mariano Grossi as the Chair of the Review Conference – his formal appointment will take place at the end of 2019," Adlan Margoev, PIR Center “Russia and Nuclear Nonproliferation” Program Director. 

08.05.2019

On May 2, more than 40 friends and partners of the PIR Center gathered at the Permanent Mission of Russia to the UN. Among them were heads and high representatives of delegations participating in the third session of the Preparatory Committee of the NPT Review Conference, the world's largest experts in the field of non-proliferation, graduates of PIR Center programs working in New York, young scientists and master students of double degree in the field of non-proliferation.

30.04.2019

"Can it really be true that PIR Center is a quarter of a century old today? It would be a great occasion for a grand celebration, wouldn’t it. But I still cannot quite believe it.

When me and a tiny team of my associates were establishing PIR Center in the spring of 1994, working in a small room on the corner of Tverskaya Ulitsa and Strastny Boulevard overlooking the Pushkin statue in the very heart of Moscow, I could hardly imagine that this great institution would live long enough to see the new century and indeed the new millennium. If someone told me back at the time that it would mark its 25th anniversary in Moscow, Geneva and New York, or that greetings would be pouring in from all over the world to what is now a highly reputable international nongovernmental organization, I probably wouldn’t believe them. After all, how many fly-by-night NGOs have we all seen over the years – here today, gone tomorrow?," Vladimir Orlov, PIR Center Founder.

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia

“The fact that the Treaty on the Nuclear-Weapons-Free-Zone in Central Asia entered into force is a notable success for the international non-proliferation regime. It is especially important against the background of recent challenges and crises facing the regime in recent years, as well as in the absence of any other remarkable progress and breakthroughs. Surrounded by zones of nuclear instability from Middle East through Pakistan to East Asia, being a victim of nuclear tests, Central Asia deserves to have a nuclear weapons free zone on the land of its nations”.

President of PIR Center Vladimir Orlov

On March 21, 2009 the Treaty of the Nuclear-Weapons-Free-Zone in Central Asia signed by the Republic of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, the Republic of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Republic of Uzbekistan in Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan) on September 8, 2006, entered into force.

CANWFZ-1

Its member-states undertake to ban production, acquisition and deployment of nuclear weapons and its components or other nuclear explosive devices on their territories. At the same time, the Treaty allows using nuclear energy for peacful purposes.

A new zone in Central Asia has a number of unique features: it is the first weapons-free-zone in the Northern hemishere, in a region neighboring nuclear Russia and China. Also the Treaty has become the first multilateral security agreement which includes all five Central Asian countries.

The UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon noted that it would be the first NWFZ in a region where nuclear weapons previously existed. He also pointed out one more feature of the Treaty: it is the first one that would require its members to sign Additional Protocol with the IAEA and to follow obligations of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

 

Documents

Declaration on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World (12 October 2011, Astana, Kazakhstan)

Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (with Protocol and Rules of Procedure to Implement Article 10 of the Treaty) (8 September 2006, Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan)

Analysis

Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (Treaty of Semipalatinsk, CANWFZ Treaty) (in Russian) (a chapter from the project of the 3rd issue of the Textbook "Nuclear Non-Proliferation")

"Kazakhstan Regrets that NPT is Asymmetric and Not Efficient Enogh" (in Russian) (Security Index, No.1 (100), 2012. PP.37-46)

On Ways toward a World without Nuclear Weapons (in Russian) (Security Index, No.1 (88), 2009. PP.19-30)

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia: How to Get Support of the Nuclear Five? (in Russian) (Security Index, No.3 (86), 2008. PP.77-84)

Treaty of Semipalatinsk (in Russian) (an article from the brief encyclopedia "Nuclear Non-Proliferation")

Central Asia: S.O.S for Nuclear Zero (Security Index, No.3 (85), Volume 14, 2008. PP.123-129)

The Russian Position on the Creation of a Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone in Central Asia (Yaderny Control (Nuclear Control) Digest No.9. Winter 1998/1999. PP.15-24)

PIR PRESS

Treaty on the Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia entered into force (PIR-PRESS, 10 April 2009)

The unique feature of the draft Treaty establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia is its provision making compliance with the IAEA Additional Protocol legally binding for the states of the region (PIR-PRESS, 8 September 2006)

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