Chronology

Great Britain conducts its last nuclear test.
26.11.1991
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PIR PRESS NEWS

25.11.2020

“In this transitional period, further strengthening of the dialogue with external partners, in particular BRICS-Plus, is of paramount importance. The absence of the states of the Middle East and Southeast Asia in the “club” at present limits the potential for the formation of a BRICS partner network. Whereas the “club” has a generally strong membership, so far, none of the states of the Islamic world participates in BRICS. This creates a certain imbalance, even though the Muslim population makes up a significant share in two of the five BRICS countries (India and Russia)”, ‒ PIR Center's report on the prospects of BRICS enlargement from the point of view of international security and Russia's interests.

24.11.2020

On the November 16 the U.S. conducted a successful test of the SM-3 Block IIA interceptor missile. The target of interceptor missile imitated an ICBM. The editorial board decided to talk to an expert about the way such test may influence strategic stability.  During the interview Oleg Krivolapov, research fellow of the Institute of USA and Canada of the Russian Academy of Sciences, told Nikita Degtyarev, Coordinatorof the PIR CenterInformation & Publications Program, about the influence of the SM-3 Block IIA test on strategic stability, threat to Russian strategic systems and the future of the U.S. antimissile system.

23.11.2020

“Today, feeling the amazing energy of the participants of the XX Anniversary School, of my colleagues and, of course, of those, who we call the PIR Center Community, I want to point out that we are moving in the right direction. Thanks to our common efforts, the PIR Center has crossed a quarter-century threshold and continues to be active, for what I want to express my special thanks to members of our “organized non-governmental community”, ‒ Vladimir Orlov, Founder and Director of the PIR Center.   

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia

“The fact that the Treaty on the Nuclear-Weapons-Free-Zone in Central Asia entered into force is a notable success for the international non-proliferation regime. It is especially important against the background of recent challenges and crises facing the regime in recent years, as well as in the absence of any other remarkable progress and breakthroughs. Surrounded by zones of nuclear instability from Middle East through Pakistan to East Asia, being a victim of nuclear tests, Central Asia deserves to have a nuclear weapons free zone on the land of its nations”.

President of PIR Center Vladimir Orlov

On March 21, 2009 the Treaty of the Nuclear-Weapons-Free-Zone in Central Asia signed by the Republic of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, the Republic of Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and the Republic of Uzbekistan in Semipalatinsk (Kazakhstan) on September 8, 2006, entered into force.

CANWFZ-1

Its member-states undertake to ban production, acquisition and deployment of nuclear weapons and its components or other nuclear explosive devices on their territories. At the same time, the Treaty allows using nuclear energy for peacful purposes.

A new zone in Central Asia has a number of unique features: it is the first weapons-free-zone in the Northern hemishere, in a region neighboring nuclear Russia and China. Also the Treaty has become the first multilateral security agreement which includes all five Central Asian countries.

The UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon noted that it would be the first NWFZ in a region where nuclear weapons previously existed. He also pointed out one more feature of the Treaty: it is the first one that would require its members to sign Additional Protocol with the IAEA and to follow obligations of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

 

Documents

Declaration on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free World (12 October 2011, Astana, Kazakhstan)

Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (with Protocol and Rules of Procedure to Implement Article 10 of the Treaty) (8 September 2006, Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan)

Analysis

Treaty on a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia (Treaty of Semipalatinsk, CANWFZ Treaty) (in Russian) (a chapter from the project of the 3rd issue of the Textbook "Nuclear Non-Proliferation")

"Kazakhstan Regrets that NPT is Asymmetric and Not Efficient Enogh" (in Russian) (Security Index, No.1 (100), 2012. PP.37-46)

On Ways toward a World without Nuclear Weapons (in Russian) (Security Index, No.1 (88), 2009. PP.19-30)

Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia: How to Get Support of the Nuclear Five? (in Russian) (Security Index, No.3 (86), 2008. PP.77-84)

Treaty of Semipalatinsk (in Russian) (an article from the brief encyclopedia "Nuclear Non-Proliferation")

Central Asia: S.O.S for Nuclear Zero (Security Index, No.3 (85), Volume 14, 2008. PP.123-129)

The Russian Position on the Creation of a Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone in Central Asia (Yaderny Control (Nuclear Control) Digest No.9. Winter 1998/1999. PP.15-24)

PIR PRESS

Treaty on the Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in Central Asia entered into force (PIR-PRESS, 10 April 2009)

The unique feature of the draft Treaty establishing a nuclear-weapon-free zone in Central Asia is its provision making compliance with the IAEA Additional Protocol legally binding for the states of the region (PIR-PRESS, 8 September 2006)

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