Chronology

Russia and India signed an international agreement on cooperation in the construction of 4 additional units at Kudankulam, as well as on the construction of nuclear power plants according to Russian projects on new sites in India
05.12.2008
The end of the strategic offensive arms reduction period under the Treaty on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START I Treaty)
05.12.2001
The Treaty on the Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive Arms (START I), transformed by the Lisbon Protocol of 1992 comes into force
05.12.1994
The adoption of Memoranda on Security Guarantees on the part of Russia, the U.S. and the UK. The memoranda are needed because of Ukraine, Byelorussia and Kazakhstan joining NPT.
05.12.1994
Ukraine joins the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty as a non-nuclear weapons state.
05.12.1994
A U.S. sea-borne aircraft with an atomic bomb onboard crashes 200 miles from Okinawa.
05.12.1965
The first world nuclear propelled surface ship, the icebreaker Lenin, is commissioned.
05.12.1957
France sets up an atomic bomb development committee within the Commissariat for Atomic Energy.
05.12.1956
PIR PRESS LOGO

PIR PRESS NEWS

04.12.2020

"The development of nuclear energy in Saudi Arabia is a forward-looking and important task. The State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” has every chance to become one of the KSA’s key partners in the development of peaceful uses of nuclear energy because it already has extensive experience in working with nuclear newcomer countries in difficult climatic conditions with lack of the necessary infrastructure", ‒ Inna Rodina, PIR Center intern. 

01.12.2020

“It is difficult for me to say how many pillars PIR Center is based on, but one of them is definitely the interns. Their hard work, intelligence, and creativity make a substantial contribution to our work», ‒ Sergey Semenov, Nuclear Nonproliferation & Russia Program Coordinator.

27.11.2020

International security is not a center of the world, but a reflection of profound processes that nowadays are characterized by a growing randomness and shrinking planning horizon. Confidence, privacy and confidentiality of diplomacy are deteriorating. Ensuring security requires not only technical, but also political decisions. Under such circumstances the aim of the Russian foreign policy is to find a balance between development and security amidst an incoming new wave of globalization. To secure its status of a great power, Russia needs to preserve its relevance among other players and play a role of additional element to the situation of unsteady equilibrium.

PIR Center and MGIMO University Joint Module “WMD Nonproliferation and International Security”

SYLLABUS

“WMD NONPROLIFERATION AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY” 

"Governance and Global Affairs" M. A. in International Affairs

Course Description

International community faces new threats of weapons of mass destruction use and proliferation. Over the last two decades after the end of the cold war, Russia, the USA, other nuclear-weapon states as well as other countries and international organizations have acquired invaluable experience in international negotiations and implementation of joint agreements on nuclear weapons reductions, development of export control and nuclear security systems, as well as international cooperation in nuclear energy. Even with political changes, cooperation on nuclear sphere is a key factor of international security and successful solution of global and regional nonproliferation problems.

At the same time, the WMD nonproliferation regime is being presented with completely new challenges. On the one hand, global economic and political changes and technical progress are opening new opportunities for development, while on the other hand the risk of WMD proliferation and a new arms race are growing. Political and military issues are intricately intertwined with all other aspects of life in the world. In order to meet these challenges, there is a need for a new level of expertise in nonproliferation and international security, one that is founded on the latest advances in science and interdisciplinary research, as well as continued professional advancement.

The main purpose of the course is developing of better understanding of the main WMD threats, risks of nuclear energy development and WMD nonproliferation regimes functioning.

It is expected that at the end of the course the students will be able to analyze critically the role on nuclear factor in global, regional and national politics, including foreign policy and military doctrines, logic of arms control negotiations and mechanisms of international regimes functioning. The students will be able to formulate research questions, select appropriate methods, develop argumentation, make relevant conclusions and present their ideas and arguments on WMD nonproliferation issues. Knowledge and skills obtained during the course could used be both for development of the MA dissertations and in further practical work. 

It is expected that at the end of the course the students will be able to analyze critically the role on nuclear factor in global, regional and national politics, including foreign policy and military doctrines, logic of arms control negotiations and mechanisms of international regimes functioning. The students will be able to formulate research questions, select appropriate methods, develop argumentation, make relevant conclusions and present their ideas and arguments on WMD nonproliferation issues. Knowledge and skills obtained during the course could used be both for development of the MA dissertations and in further practical work.

Each class includes a lecture, discussion on literature/Q&A session. 

Requirements and Assessment of the course

Attendance is required. One absence without proper reason is the absolute maximum.

Everyone is expected to engage in the discussion. It is only possible if the students read and carefully think through the required reading before the class.

Assignments and grading system include:

Everybody can achieve as max 112 points

  • In-class activity (including participation and questions) – 36 points (12 classes –  3 point each max)
  • Participation in debates – 4 points + extra 4 points for debaters
  • Test – 68 points

To get “pass” student need to get at least 32 points

Required readings are available at the programs web page.

Program Coordinators

PIR Center:

Mr. Albert Zulkharneev

Phone: +7 (499) 940 0983

e-mail: [email protected]

[email protected]

MGIMO:

Ms. Maria Apanovich

Phone: +7 (495) 434 4501

E-mail: [email protected]

 



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